How It’s Used

Total Knee Replacement

Knee replacement surgery — also known as, knee arthroplasty (ARTH-row-plas-tee) — can help relieve pain and restore function in damaged or severely diseased knee joints. The procedure involves cutting away damaged bone and cartilage from your thighbone, shinbone and kneecap and replacing it with an artificial joint (prosthesis) made of metal alloys, high-grade plastics and polymers.

Osteoarthritis is the most common problem that leads to knee replacement surgery. This is a “wear and tear” joint disease that affects mostly middle-aged and older adults. Osteoarthritis leads to the breakdown of joint cartilage, and then bone, in your knees.

Other forms of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis and arthritis caused by a knee injury, can also lead to degeneration of your knee joint. Breaks (fractures), torn cartilage, or torn ligaments also can lead to permanent damage to your knee joint over time.